During all stages of consultation for the draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) we listened closely to the feedback received and have put together a list of frequently asked questions (FAQs) to assist in answering questions about the Project.


About the project

What is the Project?

The proposed Hi-Quality Integrated Resource Recovery Facility is a multi-operational waste management hub that would receive, process and store a number of commercial, industrial, demolition and construction waste types. The Project will also include other related facilities including a concrete pre-cast plant, a landscape yard, maintenance workshop and will continue operation of the concrete batching plant.

The Project will bring a number of technologies together, thereby increasing the resource recovery opportunities at the one location and provide a unique and efficient service in the ACT, creating opportunities for beneficial reuse and creation of products that can be used across the ACT region.

Is there a need for the Project in the ACT?

The Project supports the key aim of the 2011-2025 ACT Waste Management Strategy to divert 90% of waste from landfill and provides an additional facility to process construction and demolition waste which has been identified in the Strategy as the highest volume of waste generated in the ACT.

While there are other proposals for waste centres being considered across the ACT, these are not approved projects and target different waste streams and use different processing technologies.

The Project would make a significant contribution to resource recovery in the ACT. The Project will bring a number of technologies together, thereby increasing the resource recovery opportunities at the one location and provide a unique service in the ACT.  The Project also introduces new waste processing facilities not currently available in the ACT, including processing and recycling liquid waste, grease trap waste and oily waste water in addition to producing refuse-derived fuel.

In addition to addressing ACT legislative, policy and strategy objectives, the Project will result in a reduction in greenhouse gas, increased reuse and recycling of products and direct creation of 84 operational jobs and further construction and indirect jobs for the region.

Where can I find out more?

For more information about the need and justification for the Project refer Section 2.5 of the draft EIS.

Why are you proposing to place the Project in Fyshwick?

Several locations were considered including locations within Queanbeyan East, Hume and Beard as well as other locations within Fyshwick. These sites presented a number of challenges that included, size and constraint limitations, longer travel distances for waste-carrying vehicles to and from ACT-based customers and requirements for remediating existing groundwater and soil contamination.

The site of the Project at Tennant Street Fyshwick is suitably zoned, centrally located and of sufficient size and distance from sensitive receivers to provide a suitable regional waste management and recycling solution for a number of waste types. As a central location within the ACT, this further reduces the potential waste footprint.

Does Hi-Quality operate similar facilities elsewhere in Australia?

Hi-Quality operates a number of sites that have similar logistics, scale and/or operation to the Project proposed for Fyshwick. Similar sites are located in New South Wales, Victoria and Queensland.

Where can I find out more?
Section 1.2 on page 4 of the EIS lists the locations of these similar facilities.

What are the proposed operational hours of the facility?

The Project would receive waste and dispatch products 24-hours a day, all year round, including public holidays. However, proposed operational hours for waste processing and other manufacturing activities will be from 6am to 6pm.


Social, environmental and economic outcomes

Will the project create jobs and have positive environmental outcomes?

The key objective of this proposed facility is to bring a number of technologies ‘under the one roof’, thereby increasing the resource recovery opportunities at the one location, a unique service offering not currently available in the ACT. The project will improve resource recovery of the highest volume waste streams generated in the ACT and reuse of waste within the ACT and the wider region. There are many significant social, economic and environmental benefits to this Project including:

  • Supports key aims of the 2011-2025 ACT Waste Management Strategy to divert 90% of waste from landfill. The proposed Hi-Quality Integrated Resource Recovery Facility will assist in facilitating this by providing an additional facility for Resource Recovery. Of note is that the facility will process construction and demolition waste, which has been identified in the Strategy as the highest volume of waste generated in the ACT.
  • Increase current diversion rates of commercial and industrial, and construction and demolition waste from landfill and increasing the reuse of materials to contribute to a circular economy.
  • Introduce new waste processing facilities not currently available in the ACT, including processing and recycling liquid waste, grease trap waste and oily waste water in addition to producing refuse-derived fuel.
  • Generate cost efficiencies in the accepting, handling and processing of waste by bringing multiple waste treatment and processing facilities ‘under the one roof’ for resource recovery and/or disposal, thereby reducing travel distances and vehicle movements for the trucks transporting the waste and resources.
  • Contributes to reducing climate change impacts by significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions through recycling of waste materials and diverting those materials away from landfill.
  • Provides 84 full time jobs directly during operation and many more during the construction phase and indirectly in the region.

Will there be dust and odour generated?

There are some proposed operational activities such as crushing, loading and unloading of materials, onsite vehicle movements or even a windy day that may generate some dust and odour. However, mitigation measures such as dust suppression with water, controlling vehicle access and processing waste in enclosed buildings will help reduce air quality impacts and unwanted odours.

The air quality assessment undertaken as part of the draft EIS has demonstrated that there is a low risk to air quality and that the Project meets the air modelling guidelines.

Where can I find out more?

Section 12.3 of the draft EIS provides further detail on air quality.

Will there be impacts to traffic and parking in and around Fyshwick once the Project is operational?

The traffic impact assessment, undertaken as part of the draft EIS, identifies that the Project is not anticipated to reduce safety and function of the surrounding roads. The site was assessed as having satisfactory capacity to manage additional traffic generated by the Project during construction and operation.

With regards to parking, the Project will provide up to 20 parking spaces for haulage truck and trailers, 27 parking spaces for concrete trucks, parking spaces for 84 staff members and up to eight visitor parking spots. These designated parking areas will ensure there is no parking impact on surrounding roads or carparks.

Where can I find out more?
Section 6.3 and Appendix E of the draft EIS provides further detail of the potential traffic impacts of the Project. Section 2.2 outlines the proposed parking arrangements for the site.

Will you be burning waste onsite?

The Project does not include burning of any waste material.

How will you reduce the risk of onsite fires or the threat of bushfire?

As an experienced operator of resource recovery and waste facilities, Hi-Quality understands the importance of designing, preparing, planning for and reducing the risk of onsite fires. The draft EIS identifies a number of mitigation measures to reduce the risk of on-site fires, some of these include stockpile management, site housekeeping, regular service and inspection of fire suppression systems and staff training.

Hi-Quality recognises the risks associated with bushfires in and around the ACT and commissioned a bushfire risk assessment, which is included as Appendix N of the draft EIS. The assessment includes mitigation measures for reducing impacts from bushfires such as appropriate flammable materials storage, evacuation / emergency management plans, access / egress arrangements and design and water supply design.

Where can I find out more?

Section 15 of the draft EIS addresses onsite fire and bush fire risks and the relevant mitigation measures and safeguards. Refer to Appendix N which outlines the bush fire assessment in detail.

How will you avoid accidental spills and ensure that contaminated runoff will not be a problem?

Runoff contamination risks will be reduced in both the design of the facility and operational management measures. For example, all liquid waste on the site will be contained in purpose-built processing tanks, which will be bunded (secondary containment) in accordance with relevant guidelines and Australian Standards and also contained within the liquid waste building.

In the unlikely event of a contaminant spill or leak, such contamination will be contained through appropriate spill management procedures.

Where can I find out more?

Section 11 of the draft EIS includes further information regarding contamination containment and stormwater management. Mitigation and management measures in relation to spills are identified in Section 8.3.2 and 10.4.2.

How will you avoid accidental spills and ensure that contaminated runoff will not be a problem?

Runoff contamination risks will be reduced in both the design of the facility and operational management measures. For example, all liquid waste on the site will be contained in purpose-built processing tanks, which will be bunded (secondary containment) in accordance with relevant guidelines and Australian Standards and also contained within the liquid waste building.

In the unlikely event of a contaminant spill or leak, such contamination will be contained through appropriate spill management procedures.


Material types and resource recovery

How much material will the Project accept?

Of the estimated 1.05 million tonnes per annum of materials transported to the Project site (including 500,000 tonnes per annum of non-waste materials), it is estimated over 950,000 tonnes per annum of saleable and beneficial reuse product will be produced while only 100,000 tonnes per annum is estimated to go to landfill and disposal.

Where can I find out more?

Section 2.6 of the draft EIS provides additional detail on site location selection.

What waste won’t be accepted by the Hi-Quality Integrated Resource Recovery Facility?

The following waste types will not be accepted at the proposed facility:

  • Municipal waste
  • Food waste
  • Clinical waste
  • Garden waste
  • Unpackaged asbestos containing material

How will you manage asbestos containing materials?

Small quantities of secured (packaged) asbestos containing material will be accepted at the site for temporary storage and transfer to a licenced landfill facility.  All transport and storage of asbestos containing material would be carried out in accordance with the ACT Government requirements for the transport and disposal of asbestos contaminated wastes.

Any unpackaged asbestos containing material would be rejected.

The incoming asbestos containing material will be stored in two purpose-built, fully enclosed containers, housed within a building.

Where can I find out more?

Section 2.2 of the draft EIS provides further detail on storage and transfer of asbestos containing material.

What hazardous chemicals and materials will be stored onsite?

The following hazardous chemicals are proposed to be stored on site for operational purposes:

  • Diesel fuel
  • Autogas (LPG for vehicles)
  • Minor quantities of cleaning, pest control, lubricant and repair products
  • Acetylene and argoshield used in welding.

The materials and chemicals would be stored and handled as per Australian Standard requirements.

Where can I find out more?

Section 8.2 of the draft EIS provides further detail on hazardous chemicals and materials.


Planning and consultation process

Where has previous stakeholder consultation feedback been addressed within the draft EIS?

Previous stakeholder feedback on the Project we received, prior to drafting the EIS, has been addressed within Section 18 of the draft EIS including Table 33 for community feedback and Table 34 for government agency feedback.  

How do I provide feedback on the Project?

The notification period for providing written representations on the Project draft EIS has concluded. To view the public representations visit the dedicated Integrated Resource Recovery Facility EIS webpage on the ACT Environment, Planning and Sustainable Development directorate (EPSDD) website.

What are the remaining planning steps required for the Project to go ahead?

Following the notification period of the draft EIS, a revised EIS will be prepared, addressing all representations during the notification period. The ACT Environment, Planning and Sustainability Services Directorate will then assess the revised EIS and the Minister for Planning will make a determination.

Following the EIS process, an impact track development application for the Project will be submitted to the Authority for assessment.

Where can I find out more?

To read more information on impact track Development Applications, visit the impact track webpage on the ACT EPSDD website.